A CONFERENCE ON: Trauma, Shame and How We Learn from Experience!
6 CEU's for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Counselors, CME's for Psychiatrists applied for.

Trauma, Shame, and Identity: Working Dynamically with Severe Psychopathology

presented by:

Marilyn Charles, Ph.D.

A 6-hour Conference for Mental Health Professionals of all disciplines. This program is at an Intermediate level of instruction. Six (6) CE/CME credits.

Saturday,September 23, 2017, 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

UNM College of Nursing-Pharmacy
Room 359

As psychoanalytic psychotherapists, we find ourselves at an odd juncture in an age of increasingly constricting standards in relation to the challenges of living well in today’s world. Paradox is everywhere. The language of diagnostic criteria itself often becomes a further burden to those seeking assistance because it further obscures the sociocultural matrix in which the problems are embedded. The very theories that have evolved in relation to the effective work being done are often couched in language so obscure that they offer more mystification than instruction. And yet, embedded in those theories is a clinical wisdom that might change – and save – a life. The challenge of psychoanalysis is always personal. How do we make use of theory without becoming unduly obstructed by it? These issues are most salient when we work with those whose development has been waylaid by trauma. Those who suffer with severe symptoms are often deemed ‘unanalyzable’ and yet, the willingness to make meaning together from the symptoms can provide the very toehold that makes the difference between merely suffering – often alone, and in shame - versus building a life worth living. We will tackle these issues together, discussing the challenges we face with our patients and in ourselves as we struggle to keep with the human developmental process that is at the heart of the psychoanalytic enterprise.

The morning part is titled: Memory and Identity: The Challenge of Becoming Oneself in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

Most individuals seek psychoanalytic treatment because there was insufficient interest in their becoming to effectively negotiate developmental tasks. Cultural values and marginalization can further subvert identity development. Such deficits leave the individual jumping past developmental milestones with no firm foundation on which to stand. The clinician who can recognize that dilemma is in a good position to take a stand for the importance of beginning where one is, rather than further subverting development through a focus on where one would like to be. That stand can be seen as the type of ethical imperative Lacan points to in his discussions of the primacy of the subject as the focus of the work. The analyst’s interest helps invite the patient’s interest in a process of self-discovery that includes a willingness to be laid bare in a moment of empathic connection, moments that the analyst uses to fuel and refine his or her ability to attend meaningfully to the patient. In this presentation, I will discuss some of the theory that has been helpful to me in finding my way through such difficult territory, including Bionian field theory, which invites the analyst to more actively introduce primary process thinking, inviting a freer free association. Psychoanalysis requires us to face the moment whole. A human life, singular in its importance, is in our hands. To the extent that we can try the various theories on for size and become intimately familiar with the metaphors they offer, we can be better prepared for the particular challenges posed in a given moment by a given patient. To illustrate the importance of relying heavily on our metaphors while treading lightly with our theories, I will offer a few cases where the negotiations regarding where the trouble lies became essential to the eventual work.

The afternoon part is titled: The Oblique Angle: Psychoanalysis and the View from the Side

Although Lacan could be very obscure, if one looks past the mental hijinks, the essence is both simple and profound: that the analytic process is based solely on the becoming of the person seeking treatment. Lacan offered us many metaphors that can help us to keep that challenge in mind. Most notably, I have been intrigued by Lacan’s notion of the oblique angle, the view from the side, because of the inherent mystery entailed in seeing beyond our limits and also because of ways in which women have been placed as the object of a gaze that is not their own. As a woman, I have felt that I stand ‘outside the gates,’ speaking towards an authority that is not my own, hoping to be authorized by someone who fails to understand me. Therefore, this issue of what stands between the subject and his object remains a compelling question, a clinical dilemma captured in Lacan’s diagram in which the analyst looks from the side to view of what stands between the person and the projection of self, imposed precisely because of beliefs that keep her from more truly being. We try to capture ourselves from various angles, looking for keys to a mystery we are terrified to reveal. The gaze from the oblique angle catches us in our games, busy pretending that if we close our eyes tightly enough we cannot be seen. The appeal of the oblique angle is also an aesthetic one, capturing a movement in the dance, a moment in the mystery. A case will be offered to explore what this oblique angle may both hide and reveal, about our patients and also, importantly, about ourselves.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will able to:

  • 1. Describe one way in which unresolved mourning impedes identity development
  • 2. Describe one way in which ideas of ‘mirror neurons’ or embodied simulation’ support the techniques of psychoanalytic psychotherapy.
  • 3. Describe one way in which the metaphor of ‘the oblique angle’ can be useful to the therapist.
  • 4. Apply this metaphor to one of your clinical cases.
-->

SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS

PRESENTER'S BIO:

Marilyn Charles received her BA from University of New Mexico and her PhD from Michigan State University. She is a staff psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center and a psychoanalyst in private practice in Stockbridge, MA. She is affiliated with Harvard University, The University of Monterrey, The Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis and the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis, and serves as Contributing Editor of Psychoanalysis, Culture, and Society and on the editorial boards of a number of psychoanalytic journals. As the Co-Chair of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society (APCS) and Past President of Division 39, she is actively engaged in mentoring and promoting community involvement for those in the helping professions, including her work with Gunawirra, a group working with Aboriginal children and families in New South Wales, Australia to halt the intergenerational transmission of trauma. Marilyn actively supports psychoanalytic training, outreach, and research initiatives. Her own research focuses on creativity, psychosis, resilience, and the intergenerational transmission of trauma. She has presented her work nationally and internationally, publishing over 100 articles and book chapters, and six books: Patterns: Building Blocks of Experience (Analytic Press, 2002), Constructing Realities: Transformations through Myth and Metaphor (Rodopi, 2004), Learning from Experience: a Guidebook for Clinicians (Analytic Press, 2004), Working with Trauma: Lessons from Bion and Lacan (Jason Aronson, 2012), Psychoanalysis and Literature: The Stories We Live (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015) and an edited volume with co-author Michael O’Loughlin: Fragments of Trauma and the Social Production of Suffering (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014). Currently in progress are three edited volumes: Comparative Psychoanalysis: Defining Terms and Building Bridges; Women and Psychosis (with Marie Brown), and Building Lives: Incorporating Developmental Theory into Early Childhood Education (with Jill Bellinson).

SUGGESTED READINGS:

There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.

CONTINUING EDUCATION DETAILS:

PSYCHOLOGISTS: Six (6) Continuing Education credits will be available for this activity. Division 39 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Division 39 maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Psychologists must attend the entire program and complete the evaluation form.
COUNSELORS: The New Mexico Counseling and Therapy Practice Board will accept these Continuing Education credits for counselors.
SOCIAL WORKERS: The New Mexico Social Work Board will accept these Continuing Education credits for social workers.
NURSES: The New Mexico Board of Nursing accepts continuing education approved through Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services or the American Psychological Association if related to a licensee's nursing practice.
PHYSICIANS: This live activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the New Mexico Medical Society (NMMS) through the joint providership of Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services (RMCHCS) and the New Mexico Psychoanalytic Society. RMCHCS is accredited by the New Mexico Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians. RMCHCS designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.0 AMA PRA Category 1 credit(s) TM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

REGISTRATION:
Please pre-register via PayPal on our website or by mail to PO Box 53115, Albuquerque, NM 87153-3115

Refund Policy:
Refunds will be offered with written notice at least 24 hours prior to the program.
Attendance Policy - General:
Evaluation forms are distributed toward the end of a program. A CE certificate is issued to all participants in exchange for a completed evaluation form.
Attendance Policy for a Workshop or Conference:
If a physician is unable to attend the entire program, their medical CE credits will reflect just the portion of the program they attended.
Contact:
If you have any questions please contact our program committee chair, Dr. David Landau at dlandaumd@hotmail.com

FEES INCLUDE LUNCH:

Please bring a copy of your PayPal confirmation email, on your phone or in print.

Members $150.00
Non Members $175.00
Students with ID $50.00

Learn to help couples navigate their emotional disconnections
3 CE credits /CME's for Psychiatrists, for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Counselors

An Introduction To The Practice Of Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy

Marcelle Grant, MSW

A 3-hour Conference for Mental Health Professionals of all disciplines. This program is at an Intermediate level of instruction. Three (3) CE credits.

Saturday November 11, 2017, 9:00 AM - 12:15 PM

University of New Mexico Medical School College of Nursing and Pharmacy, Albuquerque, NM Room 359

Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy (EFT) is a relatively short-term treatment approach whose goal is the reconnection between partners. EFT, developed by Drs. Susan Johnson and Les Greenberg, is based on John Bowlby’s Attachment research over 50 years ago. Bowlby found that humans and higher primate animals appeared to have an innate need to feel attached to and comforted by a significant other. Adult attachment relationships are believed to have the same survival function as the mother-child bond. Ideally these attachments can provide the same love, comfort, support, and protection throughout the lifespan. However, due to our relationship histories and the negative interaction cycles we get into with our partners, it is common to have difficulties with trust and expressing emotion to those who mean the most to us.

When couples argue about issues such as jealousy, sex, or money, the origins of these arguments are usually some form of protest from one partner about not feeling connected or not feeling safe or secure with the other partner. When those we are attached to are not available, or are not responding to our needs to feel close or supported, we feel distressed. We may become anxious or fearful, numb or distant. These behaviors can become habitual or rigid modes of reacting to our partners. Furthermore, these toxic behavior patterns seem to take on a life of their own as they cycle into repetitive interactions that cause pain, injury, and despair. We focus on these patterns and work on changing these negative interaction cycles in a non-judgmental environment.

In therapy, couples begin to recognize and eventually express their needs for love, support, protection, and comfort that are often hidden or disguised by the harsh and angry words used in repetitive self-defeating patterns of conflicts or arguments with each other. Partners begin to “listen with the heart” one of the cornerstones of EFT - which means listening not for the literal meaning of a partner’s words, but for the feelings that lie beneath. In return, the other partner is better able to respond from the heart in kind. This the emotional focus of Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy.

When couples argue about issues such as jealousy, sex, or money, the origins of these arguments are usually some form of protest from one partner about not feeling connected or not feeling safe or secure with the other partner. When those we are attached to are not available, or are not responding to our needs to feel close or supported, we feel distressed. We may become anxious or fearful, numb or distant. These behaviors can become habitual or rigid modes of reacting to our partners. Furthermore, these toxic behavior patterns seem to take on a life of their own as they cycle into repetitive interactions that cause pain, injury, and despair. We focus on these patterns and work on changing these negative interaction cycles in a non-judgmental environment.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will able to:

SCHEDULE OF MEETING:

PRESENTER'S BIOS:

After graduating from Cornell University with a B.S., I completed my MSW at the University of Wisconsin in 1977. In 1984 I became a Registered Dance Movement Therapist and spent 10 years working with chronic illness, hospice and in psychiatric settings as a Clinical Social Worker and as a Dance Movement Therapist.

During my 30 years of post masters advanced clinical training, I had the privilege of studying Dance Movement Therapy with Jungian Analyst Joan Chodorow, Relational Psychoanalysis with Stephen Mitchell, Individual and Couples Psychodynamic psychotherapy with Virginia Goldner and Modern Psychoanalysis as developed by Hyman Spotnitz.

SUGGESTED READINGS: TBA

There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.

CONTINUING EDUCATION DETAILS:

PSYCHOLOGISTS: Three (3) Continuing Education credits will be available for this activity. Division 39 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Division 39 maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Psychologists must attend the entire program and complete the evaluation form.
COUNSELORS: The New Mexico Counseling and Therapy Practice Board will accept these Continuing Education credits for counselors.
SOCIAL WORKERS: The New Mexico Social Work Board will accept these Continuing Education credits for social workers.
NURSES: The New Mexico Board of Nursing accepts continuing education approved through Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services or the American Psychological Association if related to a licensee's nursing practice.
PHYSICIANS: This live activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the New Mexico Medical Society (NMMS) through the joint providership of Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services (RMCHCS) and the New Mexico Psychoanalytic Society. RMCHCS is accredited by the New Mexico Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians. RMCHCS designates this live activity for a maximum of 3.0 AMA PRA Category 1 credit(s) TM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

REGISTRATION:
Please pre-register via PayPal on our website or by mail to PO Box 53115, Albuquerque, NM 87153-3115

Refund Policy:
Refunds will be offered with written notice at least 24 hours prior to the program.
Attendance Policy - General:
Evaluation forms are distributed toward the end of a program. A CE certificate is issued to all participants in exchange for a completed evaluation form.
Attendance Policy for a Workshop or Conference:
If a physician is unable to attend the entire program, their medical CE credits will reflect just the portion of the program they attended.
Contact:
If you have any questions please contact our program committee chair, Dr. David Landau at dlandaumd@hotmail.com

Members FREE
Non Members $45
Students with ID $25
LIKE US: